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LS1F Glider, BGA4665

Date of occurrence: 09 August 2005

Summary:
The accident occurred during a race as part of the Junior World Gliding Championships. During the final approach to cross the finishing line a glider, flying at a height of approximately 15 ft, banked at an angle of about 20 degrees to the left as it passed a group of spectators who were standing on vehicles outside the airfield perimeter. The left wing of the glider struck one of the spectators, a professional photographer, causing him fatal injuries. The glider made a largely uncontrolled landing in a nearby field. It was seriously damaged but the pilot was unhurt. The investigation concluded that gliders involved in the race had been flying unnecessarily low during the approach to the finish. The accident and other evidence suggested a problem with the safe conduct of race finishes and deficiencies in the training for and oversight of such events. Since this accident, the British Gliding Association has been proactive in trying to address some of these issues but its rules do not apply to gliding Championships conducted in the UK under the International Gliding Commission Rules. The AAIB made five safety recommendations.

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Report name:
LS1F Glider, BGA4665
Registration:
BGA4665
Type:
LS1F Glider
Location:
Near Husbands Bosworth Airfield, Leicestershire
Date of occurrence:
09 August 2005
Category:
Sport Aviation/Balloons
Summary:
The accident occurred during a race as part of the Junior World Gliding Championships. During the final approach to cross the finishing line a glider, flying at a height of approximately 15 ft, banked at an angle of about 20 degrees to the left as it passed a group of spectators who were standing on vehicles outside the airfield perimeter. The left wing of the glider struck one of the spectators, a professional photographer, causing him fatal injuries. The glider made a largely uncontrolled landing in a nearby field. It was seriously damaged but the pilot was unhurt. The investigation concluded that gliders involved in the race had been flying unnecessarily low during the approach to the finish. The accident and other evidence suggested a problem with the safe conduct of race finishes and deficiencies in the training for and oversight of such events. Since this accident, the British Gliding Association has been proactive in trying to address some of these issues but its rules do not apply to gliding Championships conducted in the UK under the International Gliding Commission Rules. The AAIB made five safety recommendations.
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PDF icon LS1F Glider, BGA4665 02-07.pdf (1,288.30 kb)